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St Mary's Parish Church, Haddington, East Lothian
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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



MI:
Erected by Jane Wilson in loving memory of her husband William Stewart late 9th Cameron Highlanders, Crimea and Indian Mutiny died 31st August 1907 aged 79, her mother Mary Watt Wilson died 18th December 1904 aged 79, the above Jane Wilson died at Inverness 11th March 1925 aged 76 also their son William B Stewart died at Inverness 18th July 1934 also Mary Pryde Dickson beloved wife of William B Stewart died 13th January 1951.

The grave can be found at E43.
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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



MI:
Ernest Courtney Lomas C.B, D.S.O, F.R.C.S.E Surgeon Captain Royal Navy born 24th December 1864 died 24th February 1921 and his wife Eleanor Mary Ruthven Howden born 11th November 1870 died 27th September 1957.
(L side)
Jessie C Howden born 15th June 1857 died 14th May 1935. Magdalene G Howden born 19th May 1860 died 19th April 1943.

Grave can be found at G13.

ERNEST COURTNEY LOMAS, C.B., D.S.O.,
Surgeon Captain R.N.
SURGEON CAPTAIN ERNEST COURTNBY LOMAS, R.N.(ret.),He died at Pencaitland, East Lothian, on February 24th 1921. He was born on December 24th,1864,and was educated at Owens College, Manchester; he graduated M.B. and Ch.B. of Victoria University in 1888, and took the M.R.C.S. in that year and the F.R.C.S. in 1907. After filling the posts of house-surgeon to the Manchester Royal Infirmary, and of senior house-surgeon to the Royal Albert Edward Infirmary, Wigan, and of resident medical officer of the Barnes Convalescent Hospital, Cheadle, he entered the navy as surgeon in 1891. He was specially promoted to staff surgeon in 1900 for service in the South African war, he became fleet surgeon in 1904, surgeon captain on September 11th, 1918, and retired in 1919. He served with the Naval Brigade in the South African war, taking part in the relief of Ladysmith, was mentioned in dispatches, and gained the Queen's medal with two clasps, a special promotion, and the D.S.O. During the recent war he was medical officer in charge of three hospital ships in succession. He contributed a description of the equipment and working of hospital ships to the special series of articles published in the BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL and afterwards collected in the volume British Medicine in the War.

Br Med J. 1921 March 5
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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


MI:
In memory of Annie Malcolm Watt wife of Thomas Moncrieff Williamson who died at Holme House Haddington on 7th November 1900 aged 49 also the said Thomas Moncrieff Williamson who died at Holme House Haddington on 20th May 1913 aged 63.

Their son Stewart, late Captain 12th A & S Highlanders who died at Nakuru Kenya Colony on 20th December 1923 aged 36, their son James Watt who died at Haddington on 8th April 1931 aged 45

their son Walter Douglas, late Lieutenent 12th A & S Highlanders who died on active service in Western Australia 13th February 1943 aged 48 (see WWII entry)

Alexander Jeans Lt Col RAMC died at Frinton 7th June 1946 aged 67,

This grave can be found at J21.
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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



MI:
In loving memory of Edward William Jeffries Sergt Major The Royal Scots who died at Haddington 14th April 1929 aged 71 Barbara McCroshie his wife who died at Haddington 15th January 1937 aged 72.

This grave can be found at J10.
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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



MI:
In memory of Marianne S Richardson wife of Alexander Burnett who died 10th March 1921 aged 57 also of Jean Gibson their eldest daughter who died 3rd January 1920 aged 21 and of the above Alexander Burnett who died 2nd September 1938 aged 78 also their son Lt. Col Robert Richardson Burnett CMC, CIE, OBE Indian Political Service who died 3rd November 1975 aged 78 also their daughters Kate F Burnett 13.9.1982, Marianne S Burnett 19.12.1997, Alice Burnett 21.2.1999.
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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



MI:
Erected by James Beattie, Meadowpark in memory of his wife Jane Inglis who died 14th May 1895 aged 63 also of Andrew Beattie his father who died 9th March 1875 aged 70, Jane Reid wife of Andrew Beattie who died 13th July 1882 aged 79, Isabella Jane Borthwick their grandaughter who died 5th April 1894 aged 25, the above James Beattie who died 28th November 1915 aged 86 also his grandson SQN LDR Andrew Beattie who died 11th January 2002 aged 89.
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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 11:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



MI:
Captain Alexander Forrest Dickson OBE RD FRIN Extra Master Mariner June 23rd 1920 - !st October 2005 Birchburn - Tayside
" A wonderful life"

The Telegraph - 21st October 2005

Captain Alexander Dickson, who died on October 1 aged 85, served in destroyers throughout the Second World War and was second-in-command of Keppel during the ill-fated PQ17 Russian convoy; in his later career he was head of marine operations for the Shell oil group.
PQ17 sailed on June 27 1942 from Hvalfjord, in Iceland, for Murmansk, with supplies for the beleaguered Red Army. Keppel, under command of Captain Jackie Broome, led the escort flotilla, with Lt Alec Dickson responsible for signal traffic. Although the dangers of sailing close to occupied Norway in continuous daylight and under constant aerial attack were extreme, there was still scope for humour: when a British submarine commander signalled "In the event of engagement I intend to remain on the surface", Broome's reply was: "So do I."
The Admiralty in London became concerned that the German cruiser Tirpitz was steaming towards the convoy - despite Enigma intercepts indicating that she was still at anchor in a fjord. On July 4 the order was given by Admiral Sir Dudley Pound for the convoy to scatter and for the escort to attack the German fleet, but no contact was made. Meanwhile, the merchant ships were left to their fate: of the 37 that had sailed from Iceland, 24 were sunk, with terrible loss of life.
Many recriminations were to follow - including criticism of Broome in a book on the incident published in 1968 by the controversial historian David Irving. Broome sued for libel, and with the support of Alec Dickson's testimony, won record damages.
The son of a merchant marine captain, Alexander Forrest Dickson - known as Forrest to family and friends, but as Alec in his working life - was born in Edinburgh on June 23 1920. He was educated at George Watson's College, but left at 16 to follow his father to sea.
He became a cadet with the shipping line of Patrick Henderson and joined the Kemmendine, one of the last passenger-carrying cargo steamers also rigged for sail, bound from Glasgow to Rangoon.
In 1938 he joined the Royal Naval Reserve. His first experience of action was in Keppel in the Mediterranean, patrolling the straits of Gibraltar against U-boats. As a midshipman, Dickson was given command of the Dutch tug Valkeryie, which had been taken as a prize and had to be sailed to Gibraltar. He was also involved in the evacuation of Polish and Czech troops from the south of France, where he witnessed chaotic scenes as smartly dressed local women fought over scraps of food.
In 1940 Keppel was ordered back to Britain for Atlantic convoy duty. Dickson's recollection was that, during the winter months, seamen on both sides found themselves fighting the weather more than each other: on one occasion he was swept over the side but managed to hang on to a rail.
Having survived PQ17, Dickson joined Relentless on convoy duty off the coast of Africa, where orders came to attack a heavily armed German U-boat supply ship, Charlotte Schlieman. In view of the Germans' heavier guns, it was decided that Relentless should attack with torpedoes. Dickson navigated the destroyer into position and gave orders to fire. Schlieman was sunk and Relentless rescued 50 German seamen; but at the debriefing Dickson - having been complimented for his action - was asked why he had to fire quite so many torpedoes, since they cost 2,000 each.
At the end of the war, Dickson moved to the destroyer Anthony as first lieutenant and then captain. But he decided to return to the merchant marine rather than pursue a naval career, and completed his master's certificate before joining Shell.
There he undertook a range of assignments on the marine side of the business, including organising hydrographic surveys in Borneo and becoming a temporary US lieutenant colonel in order to carry out work in Korea. He was involved in the early development of offshore drilling operations, and in addressing problems arising from the increase in tanker sizes from around 20,000 tonnes in 1950 to 300,000 tonnes in the 1970s.
With his engineering colleagues Dickson introduced innovations, later to become industry standards, that included a device slung between tankers to allow part of a cargo to be offloaded - this had been inspired by his observation of Norwegian whalers using the body of a dead whale as a buffer between ships in heavy seas.
He joined the board of Shell Marine in 1970 and was later head of Marine Operational Services for Shell International, controlling what was then one of the largest shipping operations in the world.
He was increasingly concerned with issues of safety and pollution. When the tanker Pacific Glory ran aground in the Channel, his handling of the incident minimised pollution - in stark contrast to the earlier disaster of the Torrey Canyon. The wreck of the Amoco Cadiz, which spilled 1.6 million barrels of Shell oil off the French coast in 1978, was largely beyond his control since the ship belonged to another company, but it fell to him to respond to public criticism.
He was also a leading proponent of the adoption of standard shipping lanes in the English Channel and elsewhere, an initiative for which he received the Institute of Navigation medal. He was appointed OBE in 1979.
Dickson retired to Kenmore on Loch Tay, where he occupied himself with fishing, curling, golf and bridge and sat as an honorary sheriff in Perth. He also joined the Northern Lighthouse Board, the body responsible for Scottish coastal navigation; he was proud of ensuring that, despite budgetary pressures, the Board's ageing fleet was replaced by a modern British-built vessel, the Pharos. In 1995 he published his memoirs, Seafaring - a Chosen Profession.
Modest about his achievements and always interested in other people, Alec Dickson was a man of courage, loyalty and good spirits.
He married, in 1947, Norma Houston; they had three sons and two daughters. As he wished, his passing was marked with a "really good wake" and a Ceilidh dance.
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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 11:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



MI:
In loving memory of John McVie BL.WS Captain 7/9th Royal Scots who died 15th January 2006 aged 86 a dear father and grandfather and devoted husband of Lindsaye Woodburn Mair.
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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2010 12:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote




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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2010 1:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote


Here lies John William and Christian Nicolson children to John Nicolson Baxter Burgess of Haddington and Margaret Shiel his spouse. 1697

Here lyes David Aitchison Baxter Burges of Haddingtoun who died the 9 of Septr 1696 also 3 of his children David Aitchison he died 18 June 1697 aged 1 year & Ane Holt margaret Aitchison died 20 Decr 1712 aged 22 years. Alexr Aitchison died 14 January 1720 aged 27 years.


Here lyes John Eliot ??Chyruglan Apothicary Burges in Haddingtoun he died March the 3 day 1687 his age 37 years
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gourdongirl



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 1066
Location: Musselburgh Scotland

PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2010 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



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kenmorrison



Joined: 05 Oct 2008
Posts: 734

PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 3:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

gourdongirl wrote:
WATT
Initials: P
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Corporal
Regiment/Service: King's Own Scottish Borderers
Unit Text: 1st/5th Bn.
Age: 24
Date of Death: 16/01/1917
Service No: 1477
Additional information: Son of Marion Watt, of Marvingston, Gifford, Edinburgh.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: E. 78.
Cemetery: KANTARA WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY



MI:
In loving memory of Thomas Watt died 26th August 1928 aged 70 also his son Corpl Peter W Watt 1/5th KOSB drowned at Elarish Egypt 16th January 1917 aged 24, and his wife Marion Young died 14th November 1944 aged 90 also his grandson Alex Watt Royal Signals who died in Rangoon 3rd July 1943 aged 22 also his son Thomas Watt died 16th July 1980 aged 86 also Marion Young Spillman nee Watt died 13th December 1997 aged 75.

Grave can be found at C27.


Peter was living in Garlieston in Sorbie Parish, Wigtownshire when he enlisted. (Source:SDGW) and he is named on the War Memorial there.
http://warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com/viewtopic.php?t=2128

Peter William Watt was born in 1892 in Castlemains, Garvald Parish, Haddington, East Lothian.

His nephew, Alex Watt, is also named on this gravestone:

WATT, ALEXANDER PRYDE
Rank:Signalman
Service No:885195
Date of Death:03/07/1943
Age:22
Regiment/Service:Royal Corps of Signals attd. 77th Indian Inf. Bde. Sig. Sec. Indian Signal Corps
Grave Reference:Sp. Mem. Joint grave 9. D. 7.
Cemetery:RANGOON WAR CEMETERY
Additional Information:Son of Thomas and Margaret H. Watt, of Musselburgh, Midlothian.

Ken
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